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Russell Library exhibition flier

Russell Library exhibition flier

Welcome to an online exhibition which has been adapted from the exhibition 'Encountering Buddhist Asia: Sources of Irish knowledge from the sixth to the twenty-first centuries’ held in the Russell Library, Summer 2013.

Materials presented from the collections of St. Patrick’s College, Maynooth and NUI Maynooth



Please note that other texts related to the topic of Buddhism and Ireland can be viewed at the Dhammalokaproject website

 

Travels of the Jesuits, into various parts of the world, particularly China and the East-Indies (Nangasak map) <br />

Travels of the Jesuits, into various parts of the world, particularly China and the East-Indies (Nangasak map) 

  A translation of Lettres édifiantes et curieuses, a collection of the narratives of the 16th and 17th-century Jesuit missionaries. Travelling across much of Buddhist Asia (including Vietnam, Japan, China and Tibet), these missionaries were noted for their interest in local culture and language and sought unsuccessfully to have traditional Chinese rites tolerated. Nagasaki (called here Nangasak) was briefly granted to the Jesuits as a fiefdom between 1580-87. The Library’s copy is inscribed “Nicholas Callan” (Prof. of Natural History in Maynooth from 1834)

Travels of the Jesuits, into various parts of the world, particularly China and the East-Indies (Callan Signature)<br />

Travels of the Jesuits, into various parts of the world, particularly China and the East-Indies (Callan Signature)

  A translation of Lettres édifiantes et curieuses, a collection of the narratives of the 16th and 17th-century Jesuit missionaries. Travelling across much of Buddhist Asia (including Vietnam, Japan, China and Tibet), these missionaries were noted for their interest in local culture and language and sought unsuccessfully to have traditional Chinese rites tolerated. Nagasaki (called here Nangasak) was briefly granted to the Jesuits as a fiefdom between 1580-87. The Library’s copy is inscribed “Nicholas Callan” (Prof. of Natural History in Maynooth from 1834)

The Chief Lama or High Priest<br />
(Irish Independent, Sept. 16 1925, p. 3)<br />

The Chief Lama or High Priest 

(Irish Independent, Sept. 16 1925, p. 3)

  The 1924 Mallory / Irvine expedition to Everest was largely financed by John Noel’s silent film Epic of Everest. Screenings were preceded by musical and dance performances from six “dancing lamas” (in fact one lama and five monks) who had been smuggled out of Tibet for the purpose, causing a major diplomatic rift between Britain and Tibet and helping opponents of the 13th Dalai Lama’s modernisation plans. Here they are shown on the roof of Independent House in Abbey St in September 1925.

Some of the Tibetan Lamas<br />
(Irish Independent, Sept. 16 1925, p. 3)<br />

Some of the Tibetan Lamas (Irish Independent, Sept. 16 1925, p. 3)

  The 1924 Mallory / Irvine expedition to Everest was largely financed by John Noel’s silent film Epic of Everest. Screenings were preceded by musical and dance performances from six “dancing lamas” (in fact one lama and five monks) who had been smuggled out of Tibet for the purpose, causing a major diplomatic rift between Britain and Tibet and helping opponents of the 13th Dalai Lama’s modernisation plans. Here they are shown on the roof of Independent House in Abbey St in September 1925.

Freeman’s Journal, April 23 1920, p. 1<br />

'Buddha' mentioned in  Freeman's Journal, April 23 1920

  This 1920 newspaper advertisement is perhaps one of the first appearances of ‘Buddha’ as a generic authority for gnomic feel-good statements aimed at a consumer market.

La vie de Saint François Xavier de la compagnie de Jésus apôtre des Indes et du Japon (map)<br />

La vie de Saint François Xavier de la compagnie de Jésus apôtre des Indes et du Japon (map)

  The pioneer Jesuit missionary Francis Xavier’s travels took him to much of maritime South and East Asia, including Ceylon and Japan. The cult of Xavier in Ireland has involved widespread distribution of hagiographies and biographies. Bouhours’ text was one of the earliest and most popular, being translated into English in 1688 by John Dryden.

THE CENSUS OF IRELAND, 1871 . <br />
Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin, Ireland), Wednesday, December 8, 1875; Issue N/A<br />

THE CENSUS OF IRELAND, 1871 . 

  According to the results of the Census of Ireland, 1871, Buddhism was one of ‘motley beliefs’ submitted under denominations.
“Among the motley beliefs comprised under “all other denominations,” we find represented such creeds as Buddhism, Socialism, Positivism, Mahometanism, Rationalism, Revivalism, and several other “isms,”…”

China, in a series of views, displaying the scenery, architecture, and social habits, of that ancient empire<br />
 (title page)<br />